Select Page

ACTORS FROM THE LONDON STAGE

ACTORS FROM THE LONDON STAGE

"...actors have a personal connection with dramatic texts, which is distinctive and different from the scholars.”

-Sir Patrick Stewart- Founding Director

WATCH

Actors from the London Stage - Residency Video

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Does the Actors From The London Stage residency need to be a full week? Can I schedule a performance without a residency?

The intensive and far-reaching residencies developed by AFTLS are designed to last a minimum of a full week on each campus. The length of the visit allows for up to 50 services, which provide a deep and engaging residency across campus. Each week includes up to three performances (worth 5 services each) of one of Shakespeare’s masterpieces. The performances are a capstone of the week and are not scheduled independent of a residency.

How do I make the most of my week with AFTLS?

Making the most of your AFTLS residency is our top priority.  The AFTLS office is happy to discuss classes that have been particularly successful in the past, and are happy to help you craft workshops that suit your individual needs.  In the most basic sense, the best classes are flexible by nature and allow the actor to draw on his or her unique skills to impart the lesson.  Upon arriving at the host institution, each faculty member who has requested a workshop will have a chance to speak one-on-one with the actor assigned to his or her class during the faculty meeting.  This conversation establishes the goals for the visit, and gives the actor some insight into the teaching style. Remember, the more flexible faculty are, the more opportunities the actor has to engage the students in active learning.

Does an AFTLS residency extend beyond theater and English classes?

Yes!  AFTLS actors bring their unique knowledge to a wide variety of classes, not only courses on theatre and Shakespeare.  In the past, AFTLS has staged workshops for disciplines across the academic spectrum.  The actors bring a unique skillset (focused on their training and experience in the performing arts) that is relevant to any course of study.  For instance, AFTLS actors have led workshops on public speaking in accounting classes, debated the “morality of character” in a philosophy course, taught elements of rhetoric to aspiring lawyers, and demonstrated the importance of active storytelling for budding curators seeking to bring works of art to life for visitors to museums and galleries.  For classes where studying dramatic texts is not traditionally a focus (e.g. business, law, etc.), the actors are adept at illustrating how their unique skillset and approach to problem solving can be applied to the field.

What are some examples of how an actor might engage theater and English students specifically? 

The actors’ primary focus when working with Shakespeare and other dramatic literature is interpretation: interpretation of the text as performance and interpretation of the text as poetry. The actors get all members of a class involved in reading and thinking about the play. Sometimes the actor will talk the class through the lines in a variety of ways—by reading only the consonants, by reading only the vowels, or by stressing each word he or she wants to emphasize. This aids the students’ understanding of character motivations, subtext, and linguistic textures. The actor may ask a class to “act out” a particular scene from a play, or he or she may perform one scene in multiple ways to illustrate the effect of an actor’s/director’s interpretation on the performance.

Can the actor lecture on specific areas relevant to a course?

The hard and fast rule is this: On academic matters, the instructor is the expert, the actor the amateur. Since the actors are not professors, the best results are achieved when they are allowed to play from their theatrical strengths and are not asked to pose as authorities on issues outside their realm.  The actors are experts on play scripts— but not ALL texts. They will be well prepared to develop classes out of their work with the Shakespeare play AFTLS is performing, and will also have experience with other dramatic texts and other areas of study.

Can the actor attend a class to read a text for the students?

Although it may sound lovely in a British voice, bringing the actor into a class simply to read a scene or passage is generally not the best use of the class time. The actors excel at working with the students—getting them to read, act, interpret, and engage.

Finally…

A single workshop in a course is only one part of the AFTLS residency experience.  Please encourage the students to attend a performance of the play. The students are generally excited to see “their actor” perform, and will certainly come away from the experience with a newfound appreciation of Shakespeare and the arts!

 

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Does the Actors From The London Stage residency need to be a full week? Can I schedule a performance without a residency?

The intensive and far-reaching residencies developed by AFTLS are designed to last a minimum of a full week on each campus. The length of the visit allows for up to 50 services, which provide a deep and engaging residency across campus. Each week includes up to three performances (worth 5 services each) of one of Shakespeare’s masterpieces. The performances are a capstone of the week and are not scheduled independent of a residency.

How do I make the most of my week with AFTLS?

Making the most of your AFTLS residency is our top priority.  The AFTLS office is happy to discuss classes that have been particularly successful in the past, and are happy to help you craft workshops that suit your individual needs.  In the most basic sense, the best classes are flexible by nature and allow the actor to draw on his or her unique skills to impart the lesson.  Upon arriving at the host institution, each faculty member who has requested a workshop will have a chance to speak one-on-one with the actor assigned to his or her class during the faculty meeting.  This conversation establishes the goals for the visit, and gives the actor some insight into the teaching style. Remember, the more flexible faculty are, the more opportunities the actor has to engage the students in active learning.

Does an AFTLS residency extend beyond theater and English classes?

Yes!  AFTLS actors bring their unique knowledge to a wide variety of classes, not only courses on theatre and Shakespeare.  In the past, AFTLS has staged workshops for disciplines across the academic spectrum.  The actors bring a unique skillset (focused on their training and experience in the performing arts) that is relevant to any course of study.  For instance, AFTLS actors have led workshops on public speaking in accounting classes, debated the “morality of character” in a philosophy course, taught elements of rhetoric to aspiring lawyers, and demonstrated the importance of active storytelling for budding curators seeking to bring works of art to life for visitors to museums and galleries.  For classes where studying dramatic texts is not traditionally a focus (e.g. business, law, etc.), the actors are adept at illustrating how their unique skillset and approach to problem solving can be applied to the field.

What are some examples of how an actor might engage theater and English students specifically? 

The actors’ primary focus when working with Shakespeare and other dramatic literature is interpretation: interpretation of the text as performance and interpretation of the text as poetry. The actors get all members of a class involved in reading and thinking about the play. Sometimes the actor will talk the class through the lines in a variety of ways—by reading only the consonants, by reading only the vowels, or by stressing each word he or she wants to emphasize. This aids the students’ understanding of character motivations, subtext, and linguistic textures. The actor may ask a class to “act out” a particular scene from a play, or he or she may perform one scene in multiple ways to illustrate the effect of an actor’s/director’s interpretation on the performance.

Can the actor lecture on specific areas relevant to a course?

The hard and fast rule is this: On academic matters, the instructor is the expert, the actor the amateur. Since the actors are not professors, the best results are achieved when they are allowed to play from their theatrical strengths and are not asked to pose as authorities on issues outside their realm.  The actors are experts on play scripts— but not ALL texts. They will be well prepared to develop classes out of their work with the Shakespeare play AFTLS is performing, and will also have experience with other dramatic texts and other areas of study.

Can the actor attend a class to read a text for the students?

Although it may sound lovely in a British voice, bringing the actor into a class simply to read a scene or passage is generally not the best use of the class time. The actors excel at working with the students—getting them to read, act, interpret, and engage.

Finally…

A single workshop in a course is only one part of the AFTLS residency experience.  Please encourage the students to attend a performance of the play. The students are generally excited to see “their actor” perform, and will certainly come away from the experience with a newfound appreciation of Shakespeare and the arts!

 

WATCH

Actors from the London Stage - Residency Video
721 Hyde Park   Doylestown, PA 18902            p. 267-880-3750   f. 267-880-3757

© 2017 Baylin Artists Management

721 Hyde Park   Doylestown, PA 18902
p. 267-880-3750 f. 267-880-3757

© 2017 Baylin Artists Management